Spain: Mambo Number Five. Numero Cinco


Los Trenzones, Condesa de Leganza vineyards in La Mancha

Spain is probably the source of some of the best value you can get these days. Here some quick notes on cinco vinos de puta madre, like they say in the land of Don Quixote, Tapas and ever-choking-at-World-Cup national teams.

Legaris Crianza Ribera del Duero 2003 $30. After drinkingTempranillos from Toro for the last few months, I really enjoyed the switch over to Ribera del Duero. Elegant, satisfying fruit in a medium frame supported by lovely tannins. Good stuff. Paella, roast chicken with rosemary? No brainer. Pick it up.

Dehesa Gago, Toro 2007 $20. Telmo Rodríguez is perhaps the top winemaker in the Toro region. This Tempranillo loads up all the rustic power and concentration typical of the appellation plus unoaked fruit freshness. Solid.

Faustino V Reserva 2004 $25. 92% Tempranillo + 8% Mazuelo make this a real head turner. Intoxicating nose with toasty woody notes and a velvety mouthfeel of stewed fruit. Ok. Enough vino bul@#$^&&. Yummy.

Fortius Tempranillo 2006 $14. Look for this Tempranillo all over Vancouver, and when you find it, snatch a couple (cases). Possibly best value Tempranillo in town. Peppery, fruity acidity and weight make it a great choice.

Condesa de Leganza, Crianza 2004, Reserva 1998. Lines above I said “possibly best value Tempranillo” because it is hard to compete against this pair. From La Mancha, the Crianza* 2004 is remarkable, with elegant wood giving off cinnamon, coconut, preceding the medium bodied palate. 18 dollars? Amazing for the price.

The bigger sibling of the Crianza is the Reserva 1998. Yes, 1998. That is -let’s count- uno, dos y tres, cuatro, cinco, cinco y seis….12 years since release.

You better stick to winecouver. Which other blog educates you on wine and throws some Spanish lessons to top it off? 22 dollars is a bargain for this Reserva, gold medallist of the Concours Mondial Bruxelles 2009 (whatever that means but sounds important enough *~*) I Drank it with a friend and found all kinds of aromas on the nose. Bootylicious with persistent fruit finish.

Ok, now go grab some …y Ole!!

Condesa de Leganza bodega -winery- in Spain.

* I get asked all the time (it must be my Spanish accent -or my good looks) if Crianza is an appellation or a grape. It is neither. You will see both terms, Crianza and Reserva on lots of Spanish labels. You will also come across Vino Joven (young wine) or Sin Crianza. These last two mean no ageing in oak. Crianza red wines are aged for 2 years with at least 6 months in oak. Reserva red wines are aged for at least 3 years with at least 1 year in oak. These laws change for whites and roses.

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