Archive for the ‘Food’ Category

A hidden Italian treasure in the heart of Lima

December 14, 2010

My 13th day in Lima and after a wonderful first week of eating great and  drinking better (wine) I fell to the dreaded sickness that afflicts visitors: stomach infection from drinking tap water. Actually, didnt drink it but used tap water ice cubes to make a ceviche, which comes to be the same. Or perhaps worse.

I will leave those laments aside for now and as I recover for my next round of culinary and wine adventures let me tell you about this little place, a bakery-restaurant called Levaggi, which has been around for decades. It sits on a corner of downtown Petit-Thouars avenue, the cross street is Manuel Segura* in the traditional Lince district, a lower middle class neighborhood which has become a must see because of its market and surrounding area packed with affordable, good-quality eateries. Chifas (chinese food restaurants) and ceviche places are everywhere, as well as criolla (peruvian) food and anticucho (spicy meat brochettes) street vendors.

Levaggi started as a bakery only, like many other Italian run bakeries in old Lima. Later they added the restaurant section, which proved to be a great idea. The restaurant is unpretentious in its decoration and retains an air of old times, with its counters and food exhibitors packed with pastries, breads, hams, sausages, home made pasta and bottles of wine. Servings are massive and fairly inexpensive. Although the menu is mostly peruvian, there is a section dedicated solely to Italian dishes. Their basic menu pasta is homemade fettuccini, which you can have with tomato sauce only for 8 soles (approx. 2.50 dollars), accompanied with a basket of bread and butter, dessert and a hot drink. Or you can switch to marinara or pesto sauce for the same price. You can have meat or mushrooms on your sauce or go for ravioli (I recommend the vegetable version, yummy) or other Italian pastas.

Prices for set menus can go up to 25 soles (9 dollars) for fancy dishes or for large servings or generous servings of meat. Worth trying their ossobuco, lomo saltado (peruvian stir fry version) and their butifarras, sandwiches made with house cooked ham.

Wine is a must in an Italian restaurant and they have a modest but competent selection. Nothing outstanding but good enough for this kind of meal. The house wine is an italian Rosso but you can have Chilean Clos de Pirque out of a box. This latter one is pretty good value. Then they have Farnese‘s Merlot, Sangiovese and Montepulciano. They even have a special with two glasses of wine and a set menu for 14 soles. Pretty reasonable, although if you are likely to want more (wine) it is better to go for the half liter caraffe for 15 soles.

There are a few Italian bakery restaurants like this in Lima, all of them worth checking out not only for the food but  also for the experience, to feel that air of the past trapped behind their swing doors, whirling through hanging hams and freshly baked loaves of bread. Look for Cordano, near the main square, Queirolo both their downtown and Pueblo Libre locales or the old Carbone sandwich house, again in old downtown.

*this area is half way between Miraflores district and old Lima downtown

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Basa Fillet in Wine Sauce: A French Recipe with a Peruvian Twist

October 6, 2010

 

A while ago (I’d rather exclude definite time references to avoid feeling old-er) I met with delight a simple yet delicious seafood dish. My friend in her  Coquitlam home made this salmon fillet in Pinot Noir sauce. I loved it so much that she made it a couple times more for me. Then one day I figured I would try a similar recipe changing ingredients, which is the best way to create new recipes and have a lot of fun. So I replaced the salmon for white fish, in this case, Basa, although I have used rockfish (aka snapper) and halibut also. It works out great with all of the above. I am not fond of precise recipes, just because that is the way I cook and also, I believe that every person has a different appreciation for each ingredient, so bare with me. I would suggest try to interpret the recipe in the way you would like the final product to taste like. Here it goes.

Grab a couple 200 gram Basa fillets. For those who don’t like grams or measurement units, grab a couple fillets, each enough to satisfy one person. That would be the average person. Which means nothing really, because the “average” is a figment of one’s imagination. Pretend the average person to be you then and grab those fillets.

The Salmon Pinot Noir recipe included shallots. In this case, just for fun I used red onions. I highly recommend Peruvian red onions from Arequipa province, with no doubt, the best ever. Since they are hard to find, I used Washington State red onions of medium size. They are phenomenally good. Chop one onion fairly fine. Put a dash of vegetable oil in bowl shaped frying pan, wok or similar. On low heat melt a couple spoonfuls of salted butter. Sautee the onions for 2 minutes. Here comes the tricky part. You need to find this product called AJI PANCA. Aji (a-hee) is the word for hot pepper or chili in Peru and in most of the South American Andes. This Panca one is a truly delicious condiment, a little bit like Chipotle but less pungent and not smoky at all. It doesn’t have that bit of bacon like aroma that the Chipotle does. You can buy this Panca pepper paste in Latino shops, there are a few in Metro Vancouver. If you google them up you will find them easy. Slather the fillets with this paste, you can use quite a bit of it. Do not be afraid, this aji is at most mildly spicy but oh, so flavorful. Place said fillets on frying pan or wok and add a quarter of a glass of white wine. This can be dry or off dry. Cover and cook on medium-low heat for 6 minutes. I sometimes throw a few capers for that briny, zingy acidity that always seems to enhance fish and seafood flavors. Probe the fillets with a fork; they should flake nicely although Basa will not flake like salmon. It is firmer. You will have to learn this by experience. Serve on fresly cooked basmati rice. I have enjoyed this fish with Alsatian Gewurztraminer or a Torrontes with personality, like the Andeluna.

If you make this you will love it. Let me know what you think. Aji Panca paste is usually sold in little jars like the one shown above. It sells in Vancouver for about 5 dollars. You can also buy it in plastic sachets for a little less.

Causa with Pulpo (Octopus)

August 31, 2010

Although all dishes were very good and all attendees liked them at my last event Peruvian Food Tasting  & Wine Pairing, I think I got the best comments for the Causa de Pulpo. This uniquely Peruvian dish is delicious, tangy and mildly spicy and easy, easy to make. Here the recipe.

Please note this is right off my mind so amounts will not be exact. However, I have prepared this so many times that I am sure it will be pretty close.

Potato mash (Causa proper)

Boil two pounds of white or yellow potatoes. Peel and mash while still warm. Set aside in bowl. Squeeze one fat lime over mash, a 4 spoonfuls of olive oil (the entry level one not the xtra virgin) and IDEALLY 2 spoonfuls of Peruvian Yellow Aji Pepper paste. You can buy this at different Latino markets in Metro Vancouver. If don’t feel like going all the way there you can try a couple teaspoonfuls of turmeric for color and a pinch or more of chili flakes. Knead well until paste is uniform.

Sauce: blend half a small jar of mayonaisse with 10 pitted kalamata olives, a good dash of olive oil and the juice of a lime.

Octopus: Buy pre-cooked and then just thaw and cut in small pieces or buy baby octopus and steam them for 10 minuts until they turn red and tender. Cut in pieces.

You can make a small bun with the Causa paste or you can use a mold, like a small cup to make a cake. Set on dish and slather the mayo on top with very thin celery slivers. Put octopus on top and on the sides, together with a piece of avocado.

Bon appetit!

Peruvian Cuisine Tasting: Burnaby Heights

August 18, 2010

Want to try the real Peruvian Ceviche and other delicious national dishes like Causa, Potatoes Huancaina, Anticuchos and more? How about having them paired with awesome wines? Your host Ivan Loyola and the staff at Rustic Llama Peruvian Cafe invite you to join us for a celebration of Peruvian cuisine, this time in Burnaby Heights.

We will open the evening with a Pisco Sour and a short presentation on what makes Peruvian cuisine so unique and the current darling of international foodies.

Peruvian Food Tasting & Wine Pairing

Rustic Llama Peruvian Cafe

August 25, 2010

A Selection of Typical Peruvian Dishes

v Ceviche de Pescado. A Peruvian classic. Minimalist use of ingredients to allow the fish to shine. Paired with Errazuriz Sauvignon Blanc

v Causa de Pulpo. Exclusively found in Peruvian Cuisine, a cold, tangy, mildly spicy mash potato cake topped with olive mayo and octopus. Paired with Olivares Rose

v Pollo a la Brasa. Rotisserie chicken is found everywhere but it is hard to beat this spice driven, bronze skinned, moist Peruvian rendition. Paired with Ferrandiere Marselan

v Arroz con Pollo. The Peruvian version offers a cilantro flavored dish with mild spice. Paired with Primitivo Salvalai

v Anticucho. Of African origin and sold mostly by street vendors, an incomparable skewer of beautiful texture and mouthwatering flavor.  Paired with Caliterra Tributo Carmenere

v Alfajor. Traditional pastry stuffed with sweetened,  browned milk. Paired with El Escondido Late Harvest Semillon

Wine List

Errazuriz Sauvignon Blanc 2009. $13.99. 90 points by Robert Parker! Herbal nose, citrus flavors and minerality interplay in a framework of impeccable acidity.

Available at: Everything Wine

Olivares Rose (Monastrell & Syrah) 2009. $13.99. 90 points by me. Firm fruit, a touch of spice and surprisingly elegant for a wine at this price.

Available at: Everything Wine

Caliterra Tributo Carmenere. $18.99-20.99. 92 pts by Natalie McLean. Smoky vanilla and plum galore in this full bodied version of Chile’s flagship grape.

Available at: Central City, Surrey. Divino Quayside New Westminster.

Cantine  Salvalai  Primitivo Flaio 2007. $12.95. Ripe fruit, juicy and spicy, ideal for barbequed meats, East Indian and many meat based Peruvian dishes.

Available at : LDB

El Escondido Late Harvest Semillon 2005. 18.99. Deliciously viscous, with ripe fruit flavors underpinned by precise acidity.

Available at : LDB. Note : when purchased by the case of six the price is 13.99

Draw prize : Wine courtesy of Everything Wine. 998 Marine Drive, North Vancouver.

When: Thursday August 26th, 2010.

Time: 700 pm – 830pm

Where: Rustic Llama Café. 3675 E. Hastings at Boundary (NW corner), Burnaby, BC

Private event. Confirm your reservation. Limited seating.

Call 778 322 7701 or email winecouver@gmail.com

Seafood + Wine = Perfect Pairing

July 25, 2010

Summer has arrived in Vancouver. Although the sun has not shown up as much as we would love it to, temperature is creeping up and with it comes the need for lighter, fresher meals to keep the heat at bay. And when it comes to light, cold dishes, nothing like seafood! Lucky for us, we live right on one of the cleanest maritime areas of the world and the quality and diversity of our fruits de mer is second to none. Seafood is still a bit of terra incognita for a large proportion of consumers and when it comes to choosing the best wines to pair with a fish or shellfish dish, the subject can be outright obscure. “White wine with seafood, red wine with meat” goes the old saying, and for the most part it is a solid guideline. Having been raised sea side in Lima, and having worked for my family’s ceviche restaurant, my diet relies heavily on seafood. After moving to Canada, and being a wine apasionado, I have had no alternative but to test and try wines and local seafood in my adoptive homeland, findings that I now share with Everything Wine blog readers.

First of all, and before the season is over, get your hands on some spot prawns, sustainably harvested off the coast of British Columbia. Garlic butter is one of the most popular sauces to accompany this beautifully tender, naturally sweet tasting crustacean. A classic match is a lush, full flavored Pinot Gris, like New Zealand’s Sileni (15.99), Argentina’s Lurton (13.99) or Hungary’s Dunavar, which, at 9.99 offers tremendous value. More adventurous seafood lovers may like to add some wasabi and soy sauce to their garlic butter, which results in a delicious mélange. The cooking temperature takes away some of the wasabi’s aggressive heat but keeps its flavors. In this case a wine with more weight on the palate is in order. Kettle Valley’s Pinot Gris (24.99) is a good call. Even better, try Alsace’s Hartenberger (23.99) or Pierre Sparr Reserve, which at 29.99 has a massive presence on the palate and abundant, flavor-packed fruit that stands up to the spot prawn challenge.
 

Oysters deserve a post of their own. The mind boggling diversity and their aptitude to reflect the “sea-rroir” make the bivalves analogous to wine. East and West coasters taste different, and within the West Coast, they will have different taste and texture depending on whether they come from farms in Washington, Oregon or British Columbia. Keep in mind that in the case of oysters, farmed is better than wild for a number of reasons that would take too long to discuss here. Suffice to say that environmentally farmed oysters take the pressure off natural stocks, besides the fact that they are fed only clean ocean water and nothing else, no vitamins, hormones, antibiotics or dyes. Although Chablis (the real thing, from France, not the spurious sweet plonk made in California) is the classic match, we will look here at the best pairing for West Coast slimes: Sauvignon Blanc. Effingham oysters have a distinct savory taste, which calls for a wine that reflects that character. Wither Hills Rarangi, from Marlborough (26.99) comes immediately to mind. For the budget minded, Southern France’s Tariquet (15.99) will rise up to the job. Kumamotos and Kusshis have a sweeter, fruitier profile. Riper fruit is what you should look for in your Sauv Blanc. Napa Valley’s St Supery (37.99) is an excellent choice. A bit pricey, point taken, but then you are slurping the aristocracy of mollusks. Not convinced? Go for Argentina’s Mapema (20.99) or Paula (16.99). If you are rooting for Chile and not Argentina in the World Cup and don’t want to buy a Tango wine, then grab Casas del Bosque (17.99), a delicious Sauvignon of high fruit profile and persistent acidity.

Dungeness crab is another critter that British Columbians love to have on their table. The white, firm meat is packed in both legs and body. It is so tasty that for the most part all you need to do is cook it in boiling water (crustaceans have well developed nervous systems so please put them to “sleep” in the freezer for 20 or 25 minutes before you scald them). Dungeness, like King Crab, has a distinct touch of sweetness sparkling over the rich flavor and texture. Find a wine of analogous fat character, like a good Chardonnay. Los Alamos (14.99), Liberty School (23.99) or Oyster Bay (19.99) will do the job. For those who don’t mind a touch of sweetness in their wine, the Madrone (which is blended with 8% Muscat) should be the perfect match at 18.99.

Before closing this note, how can you write about West Coast seafood without mentioning the king of our waters, the mighty salmon? Here is when you can bend the white-for-fish-red-for-meat rule. Barbequed or poached salmon will be enriched by a fleshy Chardonnay but it has enough flavor to stand up to lighter reds. First in line, C’est la Vie, an idiosyncratic Southern French blend of Pinot Noir and Syrah is a great candidate at 16.99. A soft Pinot Noir, like the Tabali Reserva (29.99) or the Coldstream Hills (33.99) are also great picks. For the budget minded, the J.P. Chenet Limited Release (1.99) or the Morande Pionero (15.99) are the ones to look for. Look for troll caught salmon, as it is the tastiest and the fishing method is environmentally responsible.

 Grenache (aka Garnacha) is another red that enhances strong flavored fish. Seared Albacore tuna, which is harvested sustainably in British Columbia (barbless hooks minimize bycatch of other species) pairs wonderfully with a light Grenache like Vive La Revolution or Spain’s No Time Garnacha (both at 15.99). Not into light reds? No worries. You would still have a good pairing with something like the Wallace Shiraz Grenache (29.99).

Seafood and wine pairings are a bit tricky but when you find the right match, they are so terroir oriented that the synergy is rarely found in other pairings. And when you go seafood shopping, don’t forget to look for sustainable harvested fish and shellfish. That is the only way to keep the bounty of our oceans healthy and available for us and for future generations.

First Peruvian Cuisine Tasting in Kitsilano

July 21, 2010

 

 

Peruvian Cuisine is the new darling of the culinary world. Restaurants offering Causa, Ceviche, Potatoes Huancaina and scores of other dishes are all the buzz in London, New York, San Francisco, Buenos Aires and Tokyo. Why? Come and learn how successive waves of immigrants from all five continents grafted their culinary traditions on the astronomically huge diversity of ingredients found in the waters, coastal fields, high mountains and Amazon plains of Peru.

We will enjoy a delicious food sampler prepared by experienced Chef Pedro Guillen: Halibut & Octopus ceviche, Causa (cold mash potato cake), Peruvian Tamal, Seco (cilantro scented lamb stew), Anticucho (spicy meat skewers), Empanadas and Suspiro de limeña (Lima girl’s sigh) a creamy, scrumptious dessert. Drinks: we will open the evening with a Peruanissimo Pisco Sour followed by a flight of wines selected for perfect pairing by Winecouver. A sensorial experience not to be missed!

When: August 12, 2010

Time: 700 pm – 830pm

Cost: $40

Where: Mochikas Peruvian Cafe

1696 West 5th Avenue at Pine Street

Vancouver, BC

V6J 1N8

For information or tickets call

778 322 7701 or email winecouver@gmail.com

or go and buy at Mochikas Cafe

HURRY!  LIMITED SEATING

Pulpo (octopus) and Radish Salad

July 7, 2010

I was so upset with that German octopus guessing that Uruguay would be ousted from the South Africa World Cup that I decided to take revenge on a poor little pulpo I had in my freezer. The small kind, that is, not the baby ones but the ones farmed in places like Portugal or the Adriatic Coast, bagged in a cylinder and exported frozen. Thaw the critter and then steam. Ideally your rice cooker comes equipped with a wire basket. If that be the case, pour an inch of water in the pan, place the mollusk in said basket and steam for about 15-20 minutes. After minute 10 you need to poke the octopus frequently to test tenderness and to make sure there is water in the bottom.

Octopus is ready when is slightly chewy but once you apply pressure your teeth get into the flesh with a juicy pop. Do Not overcook, or it will become tough and then it will turn into a mash. Cool down with tap water and slice thin. Place in a bowl. Slice a few radishes and combine with octopus. Add black pepper, pinch of salt, grated fresh ginger and finely chopped flat parsley. Stir and add lime juice, not as much as you would for ceviche. Just the amount you would use in a salad. Drizzle with olive oil, stir and eat.

Crunchy, chewy, tangy, spicy and refreshing at the same time, this is an awesome snack. I had it with South African Chenin Blanc. It made perfect.

ps. unless somebody else did before, I claim to be the creator of this dish.

Fried Rice for the Lazy Single

May 11, 2010

Yawn. My first two days off in a row after 3 weeks of work.  Much needed. One-day breaks dont cut it. My fridge looks scarily empty. And I dont have any desire to shed my pijamas and get out grocery shopping. Bread? none. Meats? Zip. All I see is a couple free range eggs, wilting green onions, a red onion starting to desiccate, garlic, fresh ginger and half a red bell pepper. On the counter the rice cooker sits next to a half full bottle of light soy sauce. Together they look like a postmodern  still life painting. Is it possible that there be some left over rice? Yes! some white, fluffly basmati I made yesterday morning survived to see this day. So, time for brunch.

Drink choices: there is a handful of coffee beans ready for grinding. And with sunlight flooding my second floor kitchen, I look again at the fridge. I know what’s in there. A bottle of J.P Chenet bubbly Rose (15.99 at Everything Wine) and a bottle of Joseph Drathen Mosel Riesling (12.99). No. It’s too early. So the coffee gets brewed, the onions, peppers, green onions chopped and sauteed in vegetable oil with chopped fresh ginger and garlic on medium high heat. When they look tender, a few dashes of soy sauce, a cup and a half of rice joins the fray, so do the eggs and I stir until the latter look ready.

That’s all. Brunch is ready. It took ten minutes. I have no pretense anymore of chefing my meals when Im on my own. Vegetables get cut in chunks, potatoes remain unpeeled, parsley or cilantro keep part of the stems along with the leaves.  There is no precise recipe here. Any vegetable will do. Amounts? trust your instinct. Screw up once, twice, you will be satisfied on your third try.  Damn. I wish I had some oyster mushrooms.

The fried rice tastes really good. Too bad that by the time I serve  it the coffee cup is empty and I have no more roasted beans left. I really need a drink with my rice. And its only 1130 am.

I look at the fridge again. That rose is surely tempting.

ps. both wines would go well with this recipe, cutting through the oily coating of the veggies and eggs. The bubbly is light and fruity; the riesling is a la Mosel, with hightened mineral acidity. Both have a touch of sweetness to meet the sweetness of sauteed onions and red pepper.

Best Clams Ever (Until the Next Recipe)

May 4, 2010

Clams are like butter: Everybody likes them. Best way to eat them -for me, anyway- is cooked in a pot, in a brothy, flavor driven sauce. Thousand versions out there, just check out your friendly google search engine. Today I felt like having some clams and this is how I made them. They were INCREDIBLE.

Grab 8 live manila clams and rinse well

Fine grate lemon zest, fresh ginger (1/3  teaspoonful each)

Chop 1/4 Thai red demon hot pepper (more or less, depending on your love for spicy heat)

One small shallot, chopped fine

Mix in bowl all ingredients above, except for clams.

Heat a bit of vegetable oil and melt 1/2 spoonful butter in it

Add blended ingredients and cook on medium, medium low until shallots are opaque

Add half an ounce white wine and an ounce fish stock (in lieu of it, water will do but then you need to further reduce the broth)

When broth doesn’t smell of wine any more throw in clams and increase temperature, cover

One and a half to two minutes, check that clams are open or cook another half minute

Turn heat off

Let sit for two minutes

Serve clams + broth in a bowl, sprinkle with finely chopped Italian parsley (flat, not curly) and a squirt or two of lemon juice

Have some slices of nice, fresh french baguette waiting

Dip said baguette in broth

Scoop broth, take to mouth

Grab clam, eat

Repeat process until there’s nothing left in the bowl

It shouldn’t take too long

I had it with Italian Catarrato

You could do Catarrato, Orvieto, Sauvignon-Semillon, or other white wine with moderate acidity and firm flavor, to stand up to the solid flavors and texture of the broth

This is just enough for one person

If you want to impress your friends, double, triple or quadruple the amounts

Buen Provecho!

ps. Clams are mostly sustainably harvested or farmed, they provide lots of micronutrients your body crave and their nervous system is rather limited, so their capacity to experience pain is a lot smaller than say, cows, chickens, fish or crab.

Of Chablis, Oyster Cebiche, Ocean Floor and Sensorial Glory

April 2, 2010

“I prefer the 2007 Chablis wines to the 08’s. They are more classic, with acidic minerality. 2008, which some favor, shows more fruit. But what makes Chablis different is the electric acidity, unlike that of any other white wine in the world”. I heard those words last night, tasting a flight of Jean-Marc Brocard Chablis wines. Today, enjoying a sip of the 2007  Montmains Premier Cru next to a Royal Miyagi oyster cebiche, I fully understand their meaning. Frederic Brouca, Brocard’s Manager Sommelier for North America, planted the idea in my head, when he saw my card. More precisely, when he heard my accent. “Where is that accent from” asked Frederic, with an accent. “Peruvian. Ok. Taste this. Would this pair well with cebiche?”. As it turned out, Frederic knows his Peruvian cebiche as well as his white wines. I tried to imagine the combination, sipping the Montmains. That intense minerality, like the memory of the soil itself, has connotations of marine scents. Which is not strange at all, given that what makes Chablis’ terroir unique is the presence of billions of marine fossils in the Kimmeridgian subsoil where the vineyards thrive. The acidity exacerbates those “memories” on my palate, tingling with very subtle fruit and a brushstroke of salinity. The finish is long like time itself, memories of ocean floors that have been, of floods, of previous episodes of earth warming. That is what the wine transmits, the vine only acting as a way for the earth expressing itself. “Oysters” I think. “Oyster cebiche.” I have a plan in my mind.

Besides the extremely lean and mean Montmains, Frederic poured a glass of the Boissonneuse, a Chablis of lesser appellation that is yeasty, richer. The lees are stirred on this one, which has also the hallmark acidity but allows the fruit to show more, in a nice balance. A good wine to discover the beauty of Chablis at an affordable price ($36-40). Next in the flight, the Grand Cru Le Clos shines on the nose, a breeze of green apple crushed in a stone mortar. The palate is equally delicious, and had not Frederic told me that this wine spends some time in very old oak vats, I may have not noticed the almost imperceptible trace of wood. Sfumato is the word that comes to mind. The acidity and marine minerality, impeccable. Magnifico. This wine is available in Vancouver in the 80-90 dollar range.

After saying goodbye to Frederic, I walk home with a demi-bouteille of the Motnmains ($25-28), already thinking of the half dozen Royal Miyagis waiting at home. I also think “damn, I wish I could speak French.” Somehow, talking to Frederic about wine, I felt the need for expressing myself in the language of romantic, culinary and enological endeavors. How can you speak in English of la finesse et la mineralite without sounding hopelessly clunky?

THE RECIPE

Enough of that; to the Cebiche. Shucked the oysters with a New Haven style oyster knife, the only kind that really works. Saved every bit of the liquid, the oyster’s “blood.” I used very little hot pepper, a quarter of a red Thai. I could have used even less, as any excess in the heat will negate the subtleties of the wine. Squeezed half a lime, perhaps a bit more. A few flat (Italian) parsley leaves, chopped very fine. Half a shallot, again, sliced very fine and rinsed in cold water. I waited not; oysters are at their best raw. The cebiche was stupendous. Would the pairing work?

I held the glass of Montmains near my mouth. My nose was aflame with the vapors from the lime, the Thai pepper, the oysters: The sea itself. Like a river that meets the ocean, those aromas blended with the ones coming from the glass. The intense acidity of the wine equaled that of the cebiche, the traces of marine minerality from the Chablis encountered their match in the flavor of the oysters still reverberating on my palate. I thanked God for making Chablis possible.

A bientot.